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Biometric Architecture Uses Biological Processes to Enhance Modern Structures

While architecture has always been built to resemble the natural world, biometric architecture, an emerging field in the industry, is looking to the way living flora and fauna thrive as a way to enhance construction. The architects in this field look at everything from mollusks to fungus for better ways to build.

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Architectural Booms May Signal Economic Slowdowns

While great economic times foster magnificent architecture—society builds few massive edifices during food shortages—two rising theories posit that booms in architecture could indicate a coming economic bust. More than that, one such theory blames architecture itself for the downturn.

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The Link Between Architecture and Archaeology

Architecture thrives on a combination of multiple disciplines, such as structural engineering and quantity surveying. Many architects view archeology as a discipline of emerging importance to their craft. Designers use archaeology as a vehicle for sustainability and heritage.

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Patents Shaped Early 20th Century Architecture

Can architects patent or trademark their designs? Many debate the question of architectural ownership. Some designers find contentment in public recognition of their buildings as landmark achievements; Others seek documented claims on their work. The 1852 English Patents Reform and the 1996 World Intellectual Property Organization Copyright Treaty introduced pathways to protect architects' and designers' IPs.

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Ancient Architecture Just as Impressive as Modern

Architectural masterpieces such as the Golden Gate Bridge, the Chunnel to the Burj Khalifa, and the Shanghai Tower may give the impression that modern design and capabilities surpass our ancestors' achievements. However, ancient architecture, impressive in its sheer ambition and logic-defying construction, competes with modernity based on its intricate beauty.

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Teenager Becomes Unlikely Architecture Evangelist

One expects the most influential new voice in architecture to be a New Yorker columnist or a BBC critic. Not so. It seems a teenager with 2.8-million followers on her TikTok account tops the list.

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Pritzker Architecture Prize Goes to Public Housing Transformation

Anne Lacaton and Jean-Philippe Vassal won the Pritzker Architecture Prize, usually reserved for more fanciful and exciting architectural projects, for their more humble, yet no less impressive, transformative work: Grand Parc towers in France’s suburbs. City planners had scheduled the towers for demotion along with most of the area’s 1960’s-era concrete slab housing—artifacts from the country’s communist past. Lacaton and Vassal disagreed with the decision to flatten the buildings. Their philosophy is: “Never demolish, never remove or replace, always add, transform and reuse.”

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Architecture Contributes to Better Food Supply

In her book, Food Routes: Growing Bananas in Iceland and Other Tales from the Logistics of Eating (2019), Robyn Shotwell Metcalfe refers to the paradox of catching fish in New England, exported them to Japan, then shipping them back as sushi; this reveals a large and complex network, invisible to those who order Japanese takeout.

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London Architect Starts Architecture Travel Business Despite Pandemic

Having resigned from his job before the pandemic, architect Ross Logie had a lot of time on his hands during London’s lockdowns. He says the extra time gave him a chance to reevaluate his priorities.

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Three Interior Architecture Trends for 2021

Much has been written (even on this blog) about changes coming to architecture due to the pandemic. The 2021 building season indicates what consumers and designers desire for American homes in the future. The residential market reveals three immediate and significant architectural trends.

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ANIME ARCHITECTURE Shows Parallels Between Classic Anime Films and Future Architecture

A new book from Thames and Hudson, ANIME ARCHITECTURE, edited and curated by Stefan Riekeles, showcases the history of architecture present in classic anime films going back into the 1980s. The book frames the prescient nature of filmmakers’ views of the future and even poses an idea of forthcoming architecture.

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Amazon Makes the News Again This Week, This Time For Architecture

Aside from Amazon’s other major news, including Jeff Bezos’s decision to step down as CEO, the online behemoth made waves in the architecture community on Feb 2nd when it unveiled plans for an Arlington, Virginia office complex.

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Modular Construction Makes Industry Safer for Workers

In recent years, the construction industry has migrated toward modular construction. COVID-19 has escalated this shift. The data indicates an increase in worker safety for companies who use this type of construction.

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Construction of Ice Palace Begins in Saranac Lake, New York

An entirely different kind of construction project is just getting underway in the small town of Saranac Lake, NY. On January 28, 2021, volunteers began cutting more than 256 large blocks of ice from the lake in a ten-day-long project to build a Winter Carnival Ice Palace.

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Architects Foresee Changes Coming to Hospitality Construction

Forbes recently interviewed several major architecture firms to discover what these men and women envision for the future of the post-COVID-19 hospitality industry. Answers to the question varied, but all had a few things in common: more social distance, less contact, and more overt cleanliness. While it might not seem shocking, the specifics of their visions are interesting.

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Architecture Digest Envisions Changes Coming to Residential Design

A new article from Architectural Digest envisions a post-COVID world influenced by what we have learned during long months of lockdown. The article poses four theories regarding the future of residential construction and design, inspired by lockdown conditions.

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Urbanization and Megacities: The New Future

As the year ends, futurists are making predictions about what is coming next for the world. One of the most significant speculation areas, and indeed one aspect that most futurists agree upon, is that population growth will drive more urbanization, and cities will have to deal with more and more people.

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Construction Footprint at Sea Up to 32,000 Square Kilometers

Whether we’re looking at undersea tunnels, or bridges, or communication cables on the seafloor, human-made structures are encroaching on the seas and oceans at an ever-increasing rate. A recent study from Nature Sustainability has estimated that humankind has now built over 32,000 square kilometers or 12,000 square miles.

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Ways the Pandemic is Reshaping Urban Design

Even though reports of promising vaccines have emerged in recent weeks and there finally seems to be a light at the end of the tunnel, many people look at the future through a very different lens than they did before Covid-19 hit in March. The ways that people want to live and work are changing in significant ways.

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Japanese Artist and Modelmakers Renew Interest in Castle Construction

Two pieces of art have emerged simultaneously, which have spurred Japanese national interest in reconstructing that nation’s largest wooden castle, which was destroyed in a fire 360 years ago. The Edo Castle tower, built-in 1457, burned down in the Great Fire of Meireki, which burned down 60% of the capital city Edo (now Tokyo) in 1657. While much of the large castle structure remains intact, the iconic tower was destroyed and never rebuilt.

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Russian Lakhta Center Named Skyscraper of the Year

Emporis has revealed the winner of its annual Skyscraper Award, which recognizes the best in design, construction and innovation in structures worldwide. This year, honoring skyscrapers completed in 2019, the company has named the Lakhta Center in St. Petersburg, Russia, chosen from more than 700 buildings submitted to the competition.

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New Study Shows Majority of All Demographics Prefer Traditional Architecture

This year, a leaked memo from the white house titled “Make Federal Buildings Great Again” stirred up controversy. The memo decided that all federal buildings will use classical or neoclassical style in their building processes and that particular styles, like brutalism and modernism, were to be avoided.

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Deafness and Other Disabilities Shaping Our Architecture

Jeffrey Mansfield, a design director who was born Deaf, is keenly aware of how some architecture serves to set the disabled free and some stifles and traps them. Influencing work at the MASS Design Group put him on course to enter a multi-year course of research exploring how deafness has shaped space (or been shaped by it). For his work, he was recently awarded the Disability Futures Fellowship from the Ford Foundation.

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Annual Architecture-Themed Pumpkin Carving Competition

Celebrating New York’s Architecture and Design Month (referred to as “Archtober”), one of the activities (of 70 planned for this month) is the 10th annual Pumpkitecture Pumpkin Carving Competition. Because of the virtual forum this year, anyone and everyone is invited to participate.

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Did Mental Disorders Give Us Modern Architecture?

According to an article published in Common Edge titled “The Mental Disorders that Gave Us Modern Architecture,” the history of modernism was an idealistic impulse that arose from the “physical, moral and spiritual wreckage of the First World War.”

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Tiny House Architecture Competition Call for Entries

The Tiny House Movement has been going for more than a decade. Recent world events have motivated some architects, builders and homeowners to build small, and a new competition is inviting any and all designers to make their mark.

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Lessons to Learn from Chinese Architecture

Some cultures have architectural traditions that go back millennia (the first known architect in the world was Imhotep, who lived in Egypt in the 27th Century BC). It may be surprising to learn that China, which has a strong tradition of magnificent buildings, did not build with single architects or masterminds until the Ming Dynasty (roughly 1350-1650 AD). Before that, structures were created by a collective of builders and designers. This means that even the famed Forbidden City and the Great Wall of China were not overseen by a single master planner, but separated into small projects collaborated upon by teams of craftsmen.

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Construction Planned for “Space Station of the Sea”

Calling to mind images from The Abyss or 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, undersea adventurer Fabien Cousteau (son of legendary Jacques Cousteau) is planning the Proteus, the first undersea research station to be built in 34 years. Jacques Cousteau, who once lived in an undersea research station as an “oceanaut” for 30 days, dreamed of a day when living and studying under the waves would become commonplace. And new plans may be taking us one step closer to that dream.

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COVID Meets Climate Change as Architecture Turns to Medieval Solutions

Though air conditioners have long been the primary method of keeping cool, Covid-19 has taught us two things: we need more fresh air than we’ve been getting, and recirculated air means recirculated germs. And when we push our air conditioners harder and harder to keep buildings cooler, we’re producing a bigger carbon footprint.

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3-D Printing Pioneer Has Sights on Texas Neighborhood

Icon, a startup based in Austin, Texas, made news (and an appearance in this blog) last year when it became the first company in the world to 3-D print an entire neighborhood. The project took place in Mexico, creating small two-room homes as part of an affordable housing effort to help the homeless. The $35 million experiment was such a success that the company has raised a further $44 million in funding to bring their work to America.

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European Architect Group Urges Renovation, Not Demolition

In a campaign organized by the European Architect’s Journal and backed by 14 Sterling Prize winners, a new push is being made to get businesses to renovate existing buildings rather than tear them down and rebuild—to fight climate change.

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Architecture Firm's Vision of a Manhattan Without Cars

As densely packed as Manhattan is, it might surprise you to learn that 30% of the city's square footage is dedicated to roadways. But according to studies, less than half of New York residents make use of that space, as they don't drive and don't take taxis.

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The Architecture Drawing Prize Entries Open

The World Architecture Festival announced on July 22nd the new Architecture Drawing Prize call for submissions. The prize, which was new in 2017, celebrates the skill and innovation of architectural drawing, both by hand, by computer, and hybrid drawing. The point of the award is to honor the way that architectural drawings—not necessarily blueprints, but all forms of architectural drawing, including elevations, artists’ renderings, re-imaginings, cutaways, perspective views, and anything related—influence the world of architecture, construction and art.

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How Diseases Shaped Architecture in the Past

An in-depth article in The New Yorker last month described the history of modern architecture and came to the conclusion that much of what we view as “modern sensibilities” can be traced back to the tuberculosis epidemic of the early 20th century. Specifically, a groundbreaker was the 1933 Paimio Sanitorium, a hospice for tuberculosis patients in Finland, designed by Hugo Alvar Henrik Aalto, was a big shift away from the 1920s and 1910s. What had been the norm: dark buildings lit with lamps and fires, covered with fabrics and draperies, was all gone. The new sanitorium was “rigidly geometric, with long walls of expansive windows wrapping its façade, light-colored rooms, and a wide roof terrace with railings like the ones on cruise ships—all the hallmarks of what we now know as modernist architecture.” In fact, this rigid geometric shape and long expansive windows can describe just about every skyscraper being built for the last seventy years, in true Bauhaus tradition.

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World’s Tallest Mass Timber Building to be Built in Australia

Australian software company Atlassian is putting its new headquarters in a mass timber and steel 40-story building, which will be the world’s tallest “hybrid tower.”

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3 Architecture Firms Proposing New COVID Testing Units

Despite all the re-openings of the economy and the lifted restrictions, COVID is still with us, and testing continues to speed up, not slow down. But testing is in so much demand, especially in hard hit states like Arizona and Texas, where lines for drive-thru testing can be hours long, that many are looking for alternative testing sites.

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12 Architecture Reforms to Recreate Innovative, Smart Construction

In a new book about architecture education, Draw in Order to See: A cognitive history of architectural design, author Mark Hewitt takes the stance that architecture education is in need of reform, resulting in structures that are inefficient, unimaginative, and don’t properly suit form or function. In the book he lays out twelve reforms that he says architecture schools should implement—some of which are being taught here and there, but none of which are mandated by national National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) standards. These twelve reforms are:

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Good Construction vs. Good Social Media: Building in the Era of Instagram

ArchDaily recently tackled a topic that may seem odd at first, but which they make a solid case for, providing a surprising amount of evidence to deal with: architecture and construction are being driven not just by form or function but by photographability, to accommodate the culture of Instagram and Pinterest.

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What You Need To Know About Becoming an Architect

Architecture is an exciting field—behind every building there is a whole team of architects working on each and every detail. If you’ve ever looked at blueprints and thought “I could do that” or looked at a building and said “Why not me?” then this article is for you.

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China Bans “Copycat Architecture” and Supertall Skyscrapers

A new policy, put forward by the Chinese government’s Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development, has decreed that so-called “copycat architecture” or architecture plagiarism is strictly prohibited. It also severely limits the height of skyscrapers.

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Evolo Magazine Names Healthcare Emergency Skyscraper First Place

In the annual Evolo design competition, this year focused on skyscrapers, the magazine made a timely decision to name the Epidemic Babel the 2020 winner. The skyscraper, which is designed by Chinese architects in response to the COVID-19 crisis, is designed to be built at a moment’s notice at the site of an outbreak—a kind of pop-up hospital that can take mass casualties.

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Frank Lloyd Wright’s Homes Opened for Virtual Tours

Frank Lloyd Wright is undeniably the grandfather of architecture in America, considered by many to be America’s best and most influential ever. Architects, builders, and even just art lovers travel to see his buildings like a pilgrimage, and many of even his lesser-known works have been turned into small museums dedicated to him and his Prairie Style.

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One of the Greenest Buildings in the World on Showcase

Opened in 2014, One Central Park in Sydney Australia looks at first like a building overrun, the ruin of a high rise that has been overgrown in some future apocalypse. A park at the foot of the building literally continues all the way up the structure, as vegetation from more than 250 different plants and flowers cover the building. They look pretty, provide shade, and send a statement: this building is sustainable.

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Pandemic Architecture: International Ideas Competition

ArchDaily is sponsoring a design competition for designing a city in post-pandemic times—specifically, urban designs. We’ve seen all too well, from Italy to China to New York City, how a tightly-packed population can spread disease rapidly to devastating effect. It is with this in mind that the Pandemic Architecture Competition is being held to look for innovative new designs that manage to house many people while keeping them safe.

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Everything Old is New Again: Architectural Lessons About COVID

COVID-19 has changed the country irrevocably and the fallout will last for decades if not centuries. There is no way to foretell all the many ways that the world will be different because of the pandemic, but some architects are looking to past styles when thinking about future construction. Everything old is new again.

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How COVID-19 Will Change Architecture

It’s hard not to pay attention to the environment around you during this massive health crisis, whether you’re weathering out the storm at work or working from home (or, worse, laid off). Many people are using their quarantined time to disinfect, clean, and organize, and it has caused many people to reevaluate the spaces they live in and the spaces they hope to return to soon, including public spaces such as hospitals, airports, gyms, offices, and hotels.

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World’s Tallest Wooden Skyscraper Built in Rural Norway

In a town of 10,000 people, surrounded by farmland, is not where you’d expect to see the world’s tallest wooden skyscraper. But in the Norwegian town of Brumunddal, about 100 kilometers north of Oslo, you’ll find just that.

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Two Men Sentenced in Architecture Forgery Scheme

Two California men were sentenced to one year in jail and five years probation after they were convicted of more than 200 counts of forgery in an architecture and engineering scheme.

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The Future of Architecture is Post-Industrial

In the 1960’s there was the so-called “white flight” movement, which drove middle-class Americans to the suburbs and left cities for the poor. New York City, famously, was denied federal bailouts in 1975 and spiraled into chaos and crime.

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How the Brain Responds to Architecture

We all know that we respond emotionally to architecture. The style and quality of a building can brighten moods, put people at ease, or depress and cause anxiety. But recently research psychiatrists have been studying the effects of architecture on the mind, and the results are intriguing.

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How the Dutch Use Architecture

If you were to guess which country on earth had the highest agriculture exports, you’d probably pick the United States, and you’d be right. But if you were to pick second place? Would it be Canada, with its vast land area? China, with their bustling export business? It would have to be a big country, wouldn’t it? Known for cutting edge technology?

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What is Classical Architecture and Why Is There an Uproar?

In recent weeks, the architecture community has been in a tizzy over a document that was released from the Whitehouse entitled “Making Federal Buildings Great Again.” As can be guessed from the title alone, the proposal was presented by the Trump administration, and it was controversial. But what does it all mean and why is there a controversy at all?

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Frank Lloyd Wright’s Architecture School Closing After 88 Years

The school of Architecture at Taliesin will shut its doors in June after 88 years producing some of the greatest architects in America. The school was founded nearly 90 years ago by arguably the greatest architect in American history, the man behind Falling Water, the Guggenheim, and hundreds of other Prairie-Style homes and buildings around the world.

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Architecture Produces Reality, Says Danish Architect

"The Danish meaning of architecture is the art of building," Bjarke Ingels said. "I think, unlike the art that is displayed in a museum or in a gallery, is that architecture is more representational. What defines architecture is that it actually produces reality."

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The Case for “Dumb” Cities

High-tech “smart cities” are becoming all the rage over the last twenty years, but there is currently pushback on many fronts saying that what we need are “dumber” cities—ditching the data and embracing the lessons learned over the past millennia.

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Tragic Fire Reveals Secrets into Medieval Architecture

In April of 2019, an electrical fire in the roof of the Notre Dame de Paris, a cathedral that has stood as a national and international landmark for 850 years, sparked a blaze that tore through the ceiling beams and partially collapsed the roof. However much a tragedy, architects are turning lemons into lemonade by using the reconstruction process to determine just how, exactly, the magnificent cathedral was built and stood so solidly for so many centuries.

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Ringing In The New Year With New Designs

There are many shake ups in the world of architecture in the last year. Africa’s tallest building was completed. Europe’s first underwater restaurant launched. Architects and regular citizens alike watched in horror as the Notre Dame de Paris burned.

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Lord of the Rings Hobbit House Being Built for AirBnB

"In a hole in the ground there lived a Hobbit. Not a nasty, dirty, wet hole, filled with the ends of worms and an oozy smell, nor yet a dry, bare, sandy hole with nothing in it to sit down on or to eat: it was a Hobbit-hole, and that means comfort." –J.R.R. Tolkien

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Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: More than Just a Slogan

A slogan that we heard as kids in school has entered a more professional lexicon: the world of architecture. Yes, architecture has long been about trying to be more sustainable and there have been some extreme cases of recycling products to build modern structure, but now it’s taking on a whole new meaning as modern architects increasingly look for ways to make their buildings environmentally friendly, cheaper, and even more beautiful.

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A New Generation of Stadium

Competitive video games are growing like crazy around the world, particularly in East Asia, but now the first ever free-standing esports arena is being built in the Western Hemisphere, set to house the Overwatch League of the Philadelphia Fusion, with a target start date of 2021.

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One World Trade Center Leading Sustainability Charge

The observatory of One World Trade Center, the main building of the rebuilt World Trade Center complex, has a distinct smell to it. Aside from offering 360 degree views of New York City, the observatory has piped in the smell of trees and plants native to New York: beeches, mountain ashes, and red maples.

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Hostile Architecture: Keeping the Public Out of Public Spaces

We’ve all seen it, though we may not have realized what we’re looking at: there are fixtures all over a city that are designed to keep people from being comfortable. And there’s a movement underway to return these public spaces to the public.

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Some of the World’s Scariest Buildings

From museums to houses to office buildings, these structures are designed to not only serve their function but to surprise, intimidate, and even scare.

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Architects are Becoming the New Psychiatrists

It’s an old axiom in business that you must understand the minds of your employees, but that is being taken to the next level in architecture, where architects are being forced to envision a world of the future.

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Living Walls are Becoming More Prominent in Urban Areas

Gone are the days when a “green” building was merely covered in creeping vines. In a new trend that is part of both urban beautification and environmentalism, “living walls” are appearing all across downtown areas in the United States and abroad.

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House Built by Robots and Digital Fabrication Could Change Everything

A new house built in Switzerland, designed by the ETH Zurich University, could be one of the first steps in a construction revolution. The DFAB house (digital fabrication) was developed by the university and two dozen partners as part of the Next Evolution in Sustainable Technologies (NEST)project.

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Are Pre-Fab “Lego” Houses the Solution to the Housing Crisis?

Not much has changed in the home construction industry in the last fifty years. Workers show up to a site, dig, pour, frame, sheath, and finish a house, with a nationwide average cost of $428,000 a piece. And that’s when there’s proper space to find that jobsite and enough skilled laborers to do the work.

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Could “Tall Wood” Buildings Be the Future of High Rises?

In what may seem counter-intuitive to progress, there is a global resurgence of so-called “tall wood” buildings, which are defined as structures that are made primarily from timber framing and are more than fourteen stories or fifty meters tall.

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Uprooting Green Space Can Have Decades of Impact

We’ve all seen a construction project tear up existing grass, trees, shrubs and earth—temporarily, to be replanted and “restored” later. But what impact does the temporary disruption really have on the landscape, fauna, and human usage?

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Growing Up Instead of Out

As cities grow, it’s inevitable that they must begin to increase in density. Urban sprawl will always exist, but city centers grow, and there’s only one direction for a downtown to grow: up. As they grow up instead of out, they’re faced with many positives and negatives. This is healthy and positive. Growth in a city is good. But the question of whether you’re growing in the right ways is important for a building planner to consider. Here are a few pluses and minuses to increasing density:

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Universal Access to Parks and Plazas

Parks and plazas are designed as gathering places for communities, meant to enrich lives and cultural experience, but recent studies show that that is not the case. While the elderly make up 20% of the population, only 4% of park users are elderly. The problem, according to one study, is accessibility.

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Modular Construction Business Booming

According to the Commercial Construction Index, demand for modular construction is increasing, and industry insiders see it as a major growth area.

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Modern Architecture on the Cutting Edge

With all the talk of modernizing the industry, it’s also important to take a look at the amazing new innovations that are coming out of modern architecture. Here are some of the greatest new buildings that have flown under the radar. And many of these aren’t in grand operahouses or libraries, but are in quiet, utilitarian uses.

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Antarctic Construction Project Estimated to Cost $250 Million

In what is expected to be harsh conditions, a New Zealand construction company is undertaking a $250 million development on the Scott Base of Antarctica. The 10,000 square foot base, comprising three buildings, is expected to house 100 personnel against the freezing temperatures.

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How to Choose the Right Glass for Your Project

With such rapid advances in technology, the options for something as basic as glass are no longer simple. There are extensive selections to choose from when building your project, and your purpose, geography, and usage play an essential role.

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In Addition to Loss of Trade Workers, the Construction Industry Also Needs Architects

Ten years ago when the economy dropped, not only did many workers leave the industry, but many students fled the architecture and surveying programs in college. Now, when those students would normally be maturing in the job field, there is a stunning lack of experienced and new people to fill those roles.

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Architecture Firm Creates a Lush Oasis in Center of City

With a population of more than twelve million, the city of Sao Paolo, Brazil, is a thriving metropolis with a bustling economy and miles after miles of concrete, asphalt, and steel. But one architecture firm is doing its part to make an oasis deep in the heart of the city.

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Frank Gehry: Love Him or Hate Him

Despite being named “The Most Important Architect of Our Age,” by Vanity Fair, Frank Gehry got off to a shaky start. According to Gehry, “I was a truck driver in L.A.. . .I tried radio announcing, which I wasn’t..

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Australian High-Rise Made Entirely of Wood

The Green Movement is creating a bit of a time warp in Australia, as builders just revealed they’ll be constructing a nine-story building made entirely of wood. While it isn’t the tallest wooden building in the...

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A Basilica Built to be Completed in 144 Years

La Sagrada Familia, or the Church of the Holy Family, is one of the most long-running architectural projects in the world. The Sagrada Familia, a Catholic basilica in Barcelona, was begun in 1882 by the...

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Korean Highway Transformed into Park

It may seem as though there’s not a lot you can do to remodel a highway. Streets are for driving, and without cars, they’re just narrow strips of concrete in the center of town. Well, Netherlands-based...

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New House Designs Expand Definition of Buildable Space

My grandparents live on a hill overlooking the Salt Lake City valley. They have an amazing view: their second-floor balcony has always been the place to watch the fireworks on the Fourth of July. I remember in 2002...

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The Glass House: by architect Philip Johnson

An icon of modern architecture, the Glass House stands out as both an example of minimalism and an art piece in and of itself. Made of steel, brick and glass—a lot of glass—the house is...

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Frank Lloyd Wright's Ennis House Iconic, Crumbling

Although best known for his iconic Prairie Style (flat or low-sloped roofs, long cantilevers and a strong sense of integration with the landscape), groundbreaking architect Frank Lloyd Wright was also the designer of...

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New Building Proposal Surpasses Technological Capabilities

Architects are always looking for new and wild ideas that, though completely impractical, will stretch the art of construction. The Great American Architect himself, Frank Lloyd Wright, famously proposed...

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I.M. Pei: Iconic Architect Despite Flaws and Challenges

Still working at age 99, Ieoh Ming Pei, better known as I. M. Pei, is the architect behind many iconic construction projects, ranging from the massive and corporate—the 72-story Bank of China masterpiece that...

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Paris Showcases Architectural Security

A new construction project is being unveiled in Paris: an eight-foot tall wall surrounding the base of the Eiffel Tower. It’s being done in response to recent terrorist attacks in the country, including the...

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The Greenest Building on Earth

Opening on Earth Day last year, Seattle’s Bullitt Center has been the greenest building on the planet. You wouldn’t know it to look at it. It appears to be nothing more than a six-story office building...

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Future Exists in “Circular Cities”

By now we’ve heard of the circular economy, a process for making the world more sustainable, creating a cycle that reuses and captures resources. Now, circular economies are turning to urban planning to make our cities into circular cities. Right now, more than half of the population lives in a city, and by 2050 that will rise to two thirds. If we’re going to continue to build up and out, we need to figure out how to better use resources.

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