</iframe>" data-provider-name="YouTube"         3-D printers have already taken the tech industry by storm—news stories of 3-D printed shoes, wheels, artificial hearts and even guns are breaking one after another. While there are downsides to 3D printing (despite the amazing things you see on the internet, quality comes at a pretty steep price), there’s no question that the future of this printing is bright.  Two news stories show how 3D printing is moving into the construction industry. In a remarkable video posted on Mashable, you can see a 3D printer—two years in the making—that oozes out concrete, layer-upon-layer. The brainchild of Andrey Rudenko, the printer was built in his backyard, and he used it to build a fifteen-foot-tall castle. Rudenko, an American designer, also printed the world’s first-ever commercial structure, a hotel in the Phillipines in 2015.  Meanwhile, in Spain, a group from the Institute of Advanced Architecture in Catalonia (IAAC), used  3-D printing to build a pedestrian bridge  on their campus. The bridge, which appears slightly organic, using algorithms to only add cross-bracing where it was structurally needed. The result looks something like a concrete tree branches, weaving in and out of the sides of the bridge to provide optimal stability. The footbridge was in response to a challenge from the government, and will be transported and installed in a public park later this year.

3-D printers have already taken the tech industry by storm—news stories of 3-D printed shoes, wheels, artificial hearts and even guns are breaking one after another. While there are downsides to 3D printing (despite the amazing things you see on the internet, quality comes at a pretty steep price), there’s no question that the future of this printing is bright.

Two news stories show how 3D printing is moving into the construction industry. In a remarkable video posted on Mashable, you can see a 3D printer—two years in the making—that oozes out concrete, layer-upon-layer. The brainchild of Andrey Rudenko, the printer was built in his backyard, and he used it to build a fifteen-foot-tall castle. Rudenko, an American designer, also printed the world’s first-ever commercial structure, a hotel in the Phillipines in 2015.

Meanwhile, in Spain, a group from the Institute of Advanced Architecture in Catalonia (IAAC), used 3-D printing to build a pedestrian bridge on their campus. The bridge, which appears slightly organic, using algorithms to only add cross-bracing where it was structurally needed. The result looks something like a concrete tree branches, weaving in and out of the sides of the bridge to provide optimal stability. The footbridge was in response to a challenge from the government, and will be transported and installed in a public park later this year.

The Border Wall and Construction

The Border Wall and Construction

 The Greenest Building on Earth

The Greenest Building on Earth